Peyronie’s Pain

 

Peyronie’s disease pain is different with each man

Peyronie’s disease symptoms – even Peyronie’s pain – can be extremely variable. In fact, one of the things that makes Peyronie’s pain so undependable as a factor on which to create a diagnosis of Peyronie’s disease is that the penile pain is a different presentation from one man to another. Because of the wide variety of Peyronie’s disease pain symptoms, Peyronies treatment can be equally variable when using Alternative medicine.

Peyronie’s pain symptoms

The onset of Peyronie’s pain symptoms can be sudden or slow, but most often will appear in less than a month after direct injury. Often the pain related to Peyronie’s disease is worse at the beginning of the problem, and then gradually improves over time – perhaps in a few weeks or months. Other men have a delayed onset of Peyronie’s disease pain. For all these reasons it is not a reliable way to judge the severity of the condition or to use to calculate the time necessary for eventual recovery.

For many men the pain associated with the actual injury that causes the problem to begin can be greater than the daily Peyronie’s pain that is associated with living with the condition. For others, the pain associated with the actual injury is mild and brief compared to the daily Peyronie’s pain they experience. Again, all of this is related to the variable nature of all Peyronie’s disease symptoms.

Peyronie’s disease pain patterns

Peyronie’s pain most often occurs with an erection during the first six to 18 months after onset. However, pain associated with Peyronie’s disease may present itself in many ways:

  • Only during an erection
  • Only when not erect (flaccid)
  • Only during an orgasm
  • Only when the penis is touched

Peyronie’s pain originates in Buck’s fascia

The scar tissue, also known as a plaque, associated with Peyronie’s disease and the variable pain it can cause can often – but always – be felt below the surface of the skin of the penis as small elevated or flat beads, lumps, bands of slightly to greatly dense and hard tissue. These soft tissue masses are located in a layer of soft tissue in the tunica albuginea. However, the scar in the tunica albuginea does not cause the actual Peyronie’s pain. The pain originates from the many pain fibers found just below the tunica albuginea in another layer of soft tissue called Buck’s fascia.

Apparently, when a man experiences intense or frequent Peyronie’s pain, it is because the scar is large enough or deep enough to press down deeper from the tunica albuginea into Buck’s fascia. And when pain is not as great a complaint, it is because Buck’s fascia is not being irritated by the scar or plaque material.

For a more comprehensive discussion of Peyronie’s disease pain, local penile anatomy and Peyronie’s disease treatment you can start searching the Peyronie’s Disease Institute website at Peyronie’s disease introduction.

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  1. […] in the tunica albuginea cannot lengthen, and causes pain.  Occasionally, men will also report Peyronie’s pain when erect and non-erect; some men will even report never having pain during erection but only when […]

  2. […] Greater chance for numbness or total loss of sensation, or Peyronie’s pain, […]



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